License Reinstatement

Ready for a license reinstatement? In Missouri, you can lose your privilege to drive for a variety of reasons, including driving while intoxicated, accumulation of points, and refusing a breath test. The various suspensions, revocations, and denials often have different requirements that must be met before you can reinstate your license.

The first step to reinstate a driver’s license is figure out why your license is suspended, revoked, or denied. You may have received a letter from the Department of Revenue stating the reasons why you have lost your license. You may also call the Department of Revenue at (573) 526-2407.  It is possible that there are multiple issues or “Department Actions” that are active on your driver’s record, and each one must be resolved to reinstate a license.

If your license is suspended, revoked, or denied, you may still be eligible for a Limited Driving Privilege (LDP), which is also known as a “hardship license.” If you are not yet eligible to reinstate your license, but need to drive for school, work, or other important manners, and are not prohibited by the statute (no felonies involving a motor vehicle, out of state suspensions, etc.) please take a look at the Limited Driving Privilege section on this page below the reinstatement table.

The Bukowsky Law Firm has experience in assisting Missouri drivers with license reinstatements. Most suspensions and revocations require that you file various items with the Department of Revenue. Five- and Ten-Year denials for multiple driving while intoxicated convictions require that you file a petition in the circuit court where the last alcohol-related conviction occurred. Please contact us if you would like our assistance with your license reinstatement.

Of the many situations that can lead to a license suspension, revocation, or denial, the following are some of the more common that arise:

Violation Procedure
Traffic Tickets – Point Suspension or Revocation
  • If you accumulate eight points in 18 months, your driving privilege will be suspended for 30 days if it is the first suspension, 60 days if it is the second suspension, and 90 days if it is the third suspension. If you accumulate 12 points in 12 months, 18 points in 24 months, or 24 points in 36 months, your driving privilege will be revoked for one year; and
  • Following a revocation (loss of driving privilege for one year or more), retake the complete driver exam.
Points – Non-Alcohol Moving Violations
(Examples: speeding, stop sign, careless driving)
  • Pay $20 reinstatement fee;
  • File and maintain proof of liability insurance (SR-22 form) for two years from the starting date of your suspension or revocation;
  • Following a revocation (loss of driving privilege for one year or more), retake the complete driver exam.
Administrative Alcohol or Zero Tolerance
(Example: Driving privilege is suspended or revoked for driving with a blood alcohol of .08% or more, or if under age 21 driving with a blood alcohol of .02% or more.)
  • Pay the $45 reinstatement fee;
  • File and maintain proof of liability insurance (SR-22 form) for two years from the starting date of your suspension or revocation (Note: Proof of liability insurance is not required for a first-time suspension, if you are under age 21 and driving with a blood alcohol of .02% or greater.);
  • File proof you successfully completed a SATOP or comparable program;
  • File proof of installation of an Ignition Interlock Device (IID) if your driving record shows more than one alcohol- or drug-related enforcement contact. Note: IID must be maintained for six months from reinstatement date without a violation. A violation will result in an additional six month extension of the IID requirement;
  • If a 90-day Restricted Driving Privilege (RDP) issued, you must obtain certification from the IID installer that no violations occurred during restricted period or an additional 30-day period of restricted driving must be served; and
  • Following a revocation (loss of driving privilege for one year), retake the complete driver exam.
Points – Alcohol-Related Moving Violations
(Examples: DWI, BAC, vehicular manslaughter)
  • Pay the $45 reinstatement fee;
  • File and maintain proof of liability insurance (SR-22 form) for two years from the starting date of your suspension or revocation;
  • File proof that you successfully completed a SATOP or comparable program;
  • File proof of installation of an Ignition Interlock Device (IID) if your driving record shows more than one alcohol- or drug-related enforcement contact. Note: IID must be maintained for six months from reinstatement date without a violation. A violation will result in an additional six month extension of the IID requirement;
  • If a 90-day Restricted Driving Privilege (RDP) issued, you must obtain certification from the IID installer that no violations occurred during restricted period or an additional 30-day period of restricted driving must be served; and
  • Following a revocation (loss of driving privilege for one year), retake the complete driver exam.
Refusal to Submit to an Alcohol or Drug Test
  • Pay the $45 reinstatement fee;
  • File and maintain proof of insurance (SR-22 form) for two years from the starting date of your revocation;
  • File proof you successfully completed a SATOP or comparable program; and
  • File proof of installation of Ignition Interlock Device (IID) if your driving record shows more than one alcohol- or drug-related law enforcement contact. Note: IID must be maintained for six months from reinstatement date without a violation. A violation will result in an additional six month extension of the IID requirement.
In-State or Out-of-State Failure to Appear Suspension (FACT) or Nonresident Violator Compact (NRVC)
(Example: unpaid traffic ticket in Missouri or another state)
  • Pay the $20 reinstatement fee; and
  • Proof of compliance (form showing payment or appearance from Missouri Court, or if out-of-state, from the out-of-state agency).
    Note: This type of suspension may be reinstated at any Missouri license office.
Abuse & Lose or Minor in Possession
(Court ordered loss of driving privilege for alcohol- or drug-related convictions)
Child Support Arrearage Suspension
  • Pay the $20 reinstatement fee; and
  • File proof of compliance (order from the court or agency that ordered loss of driving privilege telling the Director of Revenue to give the driving privilege back)
Five-Year License Denial
  • Serve the five-year denial period and obtain an order of reinstatement from the circuit court in the county where the last alcohol- or drug-related driving conviction occurred. As part of that process, you must register with the Missouri Automated Criminal History Site (MACHS) for a Criminal History Check.
  • File proof of installation of an Ignition Interlock Device (IID) equipped with camera and GPS features. Note: IID must be maintained for six months from reinstatement date without a violation. A violation will result in an additional six month extension of the IID requirement.
  • You may be eligible to apply for a Limited Driving Privilege (LDP) through the circuit court in the county where you live or work.
Ten-Year License Denial
  • Serve the ten-year denial period and obtain an order of reinstatement from the circuit court in the county where the last alcohol- or drug-related driving conviction occurred. As part of that process, you must register with the Missouri Automated Criminal History Site (MACHS) for a Criminal History Check.
  • File proof of installation of an Ignition Interlock Device (IID) equipped with camera and GPS features. Note: IID must be maintained for six months from reinstatement date without a violation. A violation will result in an additional six month extension of the IID requirement.
  • You may be eligible to apply for a Limited Driving Privilege (LDP) through the circuit court in the county where you live or work.

Information from the Missouri Department of Revenue.

 Limited Driving Privilege (LDP)

If your license is suspended, revoked, or denied and you are not currently eligible for reinstatement (i.e., have yet to serve the duration of your suspension or revocation), but you need to drive for school, work, or other important matters, you might be eligible for a Limited Driving Privilege. A LDP permits individuals to drive for certain pre-approved purposes.

There are two ways to apply for a Limited Driving Privilege.

  1. If your driver’s license is suspended or revoked, you can file an Application for Limited Driving Privilege with the Department of Revenue, file an SR-22, and if you have more than one alcohol-related offense or you have an active Chemical Revocation on your record, you must file proof of installation of an Ignition Interlock Device (IID).
  2. If your license is subject to a 5- or 10-year denial, you must file a petition with the circuit court in the county where you live or work. You must also file an SR-22 with the Department of Revenue, and if you have more than one alcohol offense or you have an active Chemical Revocation on your record, you must file proof of installation of an Ignition Interlock Device (IID).

A court may require you to install an IID even if you only have one alcohol offense or driving while intoxicated conviction on your record.

However, there are numerous situations that render one ineligible for a Limited Driving Privilege, including, but not limited to:

  • You have been convicted of a felony involving a motor vehicle;
    • Note: Starting in 2017, if the felony was more than five years prior, you might be eligible for a LDP.
  • Your license is eligible for reinstatement, but not all reinstatement requirements have been met;
  • You have been convicted of leaving the scene of a motor vehicle accident;
  • You have been convicted of driving a motor vehicle under the influence of drugs or controlled substances;
  • You have a suspension for failure to pay a ticket in Missouri or another state;
  • You have served less than 30 days on a suspension or revocation that resulted from a DWI or BAC conviction;
  • You have served less than 90 days on a Chemical Revocation (for refusal to submit to a drug or alcohol test);
  • You have served less than 30 days on an Administrative Alcohol Suspension (for driving a motor vehicle with a BAC over the legal limit);
  • You have served less than 45 days on an Administrative Alcohol Revocation (for driving a motor vehicle with a BAC over the legal limit);
  • You are not currently a Missouri resident, or (if a resident of another state) you do not work or attend school in Missouri;
  • A person cannot obtain an LDP to drive a commercial vehicle.

The Bukowsky Law Firm may be able to assist you in applying for a Limited Driving Privilege. Please contact us if we can be of assistance.